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    Mental Disorder During Adolescence: Evidence of Arrested Personality Development

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    Summary: The experience of a mental disorder affects the development of personality in multiple ways, scientific evidence regarding psychopathology effects on personality development that persist even after remission of the disorder is limited and dependent upon the type of disorder experienced.

    Source: Clinical Psychological Science.

    As we know, every disease or medical emergency might leave a person affected in more than one way, even post prognosis. The similar thing is true for mental disorders as well. Given mental disorders are more delicate as a subject to deal with, it should be given a closer analysis. The experience of a mental disorder might affect the development of personality in multiple ways, but scientific evidence regarding psychopathology effects on personality development that persist even after remission of the disorder is limited and inconsistent.

    A longitudinal cohort study was conducted by the University of Groningen, in the Netherlands. In the longitudinal cohort, named TRacking Adolescents’ Individual Lives Survey (TRAILS), mental disorders that occurred during adolescence were assessed by using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview and parent-reported effortful control, fearfulness, and frustration.

    The study was carried out on the same group of adolescents once at age 11 and then again at the age 19 through the Early Adolescent Temperament Questionnaire.

    The results revealed that adolescent mental disorders did have small effects on personality change. The change was varied and depended on the type of disorders from which the adolescent had suffered. Internalizing disorders were found to increase fearfulness and frustration but that hardly affected effortful control; whereas, externalizing disorders were not found related to frustration and fearfulness but it predicted a decrease of effortful control.

    Again, fearfulness and frustration partially caught up after disorder remission, virtually most delay in effortful control was still present 2.9 years later, which suggested scarring effects.



    Published: Clinical Psychological Science.

    Contact: Johan ‘Hans’ Ormel, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen.

    Details: Image source Unsplash

     

    Hi, I’m Aarti, My Psychoanalytical approach towards my clients is to empower them to better their lives through improving their relationship with themselves. I believe shame and guilt is a common barrier to change. I aim to guide my clients through re authoring their narratives where shame, guilt, and other problems have less power and take up less space.

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