Connect with us
    #

    News & Research on Psychology | ShareYrHeart

    The detrimental effects of no trust: Active decisions of no trust cause stronger affective and behavioral reactions than inactive decisions

    Published

    on

    Summary: Reactions to not being trusted significantly affecting an individual and was decided by whether this decision was an active or an inactive one. However, it is worth mentioning that Active decisions resulted in a more negative evaluation toward Person A by Person B, led participants to experience increased negative emotions, and also reduced their satisfaction with their final outcome, even though in between the condition payoffs and final earnings was being held constant between.

    Source: Frontiers in Psychology.

    Trust is a very delicate abstract feeling, which we might or might not experience towards a person. However, whether we trust or do not trust a person heavily depends upon social constructs in which we live, the characteristics of the person and of course on our perception and interpretation. To take or not take a person as trustworthy, depends upon us, but does feeling not being trusted by someone have detrimental effects on our psychological well being?

    In two experimental studies, the psychologists from University of Leiden investigated and tried to understand the affective and behavioral effects of not being trusted. To do so, they employed an adapted version of the Trust Game paradigm, where the participants were all assigned the position of Person B, and were all informed that their opponent , Person A had decided to not allow them to distribute the monetary outcomes. This decision had either been an inactive decision that Person A had not offered them with the option to distribute the outcomes or it might be an active decision as well where Person A might have taken away their option to distribute outcomes which they previously distributed.

    Results of both studies have come up with the evidence that reactions to not being trusted significantly affected an individual and was decided by whether this decision was an active or an inactive one. However, it is worth mentioning that Active decisions resulted in a more negative evaluation toward Person A by Person B, led participants to experience increased negative emotions, and also reduced their satisfaction with their final outcome, even though in between the condition payoffs and final earnings was being held constant between.

    In addition to this, when the decision of not to trust had been an active decision, participants subsequently behaved in a manner which was less altruistic, as it was evidenced by significant lower allocations in a game that followed, the subsequent Dictator Game. Interestingly,it has also been observed, this act of reducing altruism was not only restricted to encounters with Person A, instead, it was also extended to an uninvolved Person C.



    Published: Frontiers in Psychology.

    Contact: Manon Schutter, Leiden University.

    Details: Image source Istock

     

    Hi, I’m Aarti, My Psychoanalytical approach towards my clients is to empower them to better their lives through improving their relationship with themselves. I believe shame and guilt is a common barrier to change. I aim to guide my clients through re authoring their narratives where shame, guilt, and other problems have less power and take up less space.

    Continue Reading
    YOU SHARE
    YOU SHARE