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    The impact of goal progress velocity on effect while pursuing multiple sequential goals

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    Summary: Goal progress velocity can impact by shaping the expectations about the amount of time that is available for the next task. Nonetheless, the present studies have also suggested that fast velocity might not universally bring in positive affect; instead, fast velocity is only teamed with positive affect if the next task is anticipated to be the one that is pleasant or rewarding.

    Source: APA PsycNet.

    Intensive psychological research has successfully identified velocity that is the rate of the goal progress as an independent determinant of individuals’ affective experiences in the process of goal pursuit. To be more specific, rapid progress is viewed as a pleasant experience, whereas slow progress is taken as unpleasant. Although, previous research work has stressed on situations in which individuals are unsure if they will meet their goal or not. This is quite problematic because there are many tasks that are simple and routine, leaving very little doubt about the fact that they can be accomplished in the time that has been allotted.

    The research question being sought by the psychologists of the University of Waterloo is velocity related to the effect in situations in which being opted for success is assured? And if it is so, then why?

    To look for the answer to these questions, the psychologists conducted two experimental studies, one with 147 participants and the other with 179 in which participants had to complete two simulated work tasks, employing which their success was practically assured.

    In both the studies, the velocity while performing the current task have been found to result in greater expected time available (ETA) in comparison to the work on the next task. Downstream, ETA have predicted happiness, but only in the condition when the next task was expected to be enjoyable (S1) or the task was financially rewarding (S2). These studies therefore depict that velocity can impact by shaping the expectations about the amount of time that is available for the next task.

    Nonetheless, the present studies have also suggested that fast velocity might not universally bring in positive affect; instead, fast velocity is only teamed with positive affect if the next task is anticipated to be the one that is pleasant or rewarding.



    Published: APA PsycNet.

    Contact: Vincent Phan, University of Waterloo.

    Details: Image source Unsplash

     

    Hi, I’m Aarti, My Psychoanalytical approach towards my clients is to empower them to better their lives through improving their relationship with themselves. I believe shame and guilt is a common barrier to change. I aim to guide my clients through re authoring their narratives where shame, guilt, and other problems have less power and take up less space.

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