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    Effects of Cognitive Reappraisal on Subjective and Neural Reactivity to Angry Faces in Children with Social Anxiety Disorder, Clinical Controls with Mixed Anxiety Disorders and Healthy Children

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    Summary: Study on the effects of Cognitive Reappraisal on Subjective and Neural Reactivity to Angry Faces in Children with Social Anxiety Disorder indicates that cognitive reappraisal might impart some benefit in reducing subjective reactivity among the children with anxiety disorders, also, it can be said from the study that the neural effects of reappraisal emerge at older ages.

    Source: Child Psychiatry & Human Development.

    There are many approaches in which mental health is studied. Depending upon the approach, used to understand a specific health condition, the way in which the intervention is provided differs. However, here it should be specified, intervention which works fine for one individual might not be so for another. Cognitive models of social anxiety have been seen to put forward the suggestion that social anxiety disorder (SAD) is typically characterized by both enhanced emotional reactivity along with the deficits in emotion regulation.

    In a study conducted by psychologists of Leipzig University, Emotional reactivity to socially threatening children’s faces and their modulation through reappraisal were systematically measured. It was done via subjective ratings and electrocortical responses in children, the children involved in the study were of the age range 10–13 years and with SAD. Total 28 children were involved in the study. In the clinical controls there were 29 children with mixed anxiety disorders, and the healthy controls comprised of 29 Children.

    The study findings were interesting. The children with SAD came up to depict higher subjective reactivity to the images of angry children’s faces while all the other children reported reduced reactivity in their subjective ratings that was taken following reappraisal. Reduced electrocortical reactivity that occurred after reappraisal was only clearly present in the older children and boys and was not quite related to anxiety.

    The above discussed study thus shows that cognitive reappraisal might set forth some benefit in reducing subjective reactivity among the children with anxiety disorders, also, it can be said from the study that the neural effects of reappraisal emerge at older ages.



    Published: Child Psychiatry & Human Development.

    Contact: Verena Keil – Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Freiburg.

    Details: Image source Istock

     

    Hi, I’m Aarti, My Psychoanalytical approach towards my clients is to empower them to better their lives through improving their relationship with themselves. I believe shame and guilt is a common barrier to change. I aim to guide my clients through re authoring their narratives where shame, guilt, and other problems have less power and take up less space.

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