Connect with us
    #

    News & Research on Psychology | ShareYrHeart

    Depression can be prevented through a healthy lifestyle, find out why

     

    Published

    on

    Depression can be prevented through a healthy lifestyle

    Source: Cambridge University

    Summary: Depression can be reduced. as per new research, a healthy lifestyle involves moderate alcohol consumption, a proper diet, regular exercise, proper sleep, and frequent social connections, while avoiding smoking and sedentary behavior.

    Depression affects approximately one in every 20 adults and has a significant negative impact on public health globally. It is difficult to pinpoint the precise biological and environmental factors that contribute to the development of depression.

    The UK Biobank, a biological database and research resource with anonymized genetic, lifestyle, and health information on its users, was used by the researchers to gain a better understanding of the connection between these characteristics and depression.

    The team was able to pinpoint seven healthy lifestyle factors associated with a lower risk of depression by analyzing data from nearly 290,000 individuals, 13,000 of whom had depression, over the course of a nine-year period. They included:

    • moderate alcohol consumption • healthy diet • regular physical activity • healthy sleep • never smoking • low-to-moderate sedentary behaviour • frequent social connection.

    Sleeping well—between seven and nine hours every night—made the biggest difference of all these variables, lowering the risk of depression, including single depressive episodes and treatment-resistant depression, by 22%.

    The best defense against recurrent depressive disorder was regular social contact, which generally reduced the risk of depression by 18%.

    Low to moderate sedentary behavior reduced risk of depression by 13%, healthy diet by 6%, regular exercise by 14%, never smoking by 20%, and moderate alcohol consumption by 11%.

    An individual was placed in one of three groups—unfavorable, intermediate, or favorable—based on how many healthy lifestyle factors they followed. When compared to people who lead unfavorable lifestyles, people in the intermediate group were about 41% less likely to experience depression, while people who lead a favourable lifestyle were 57% less likely.

    The team then performed a genetic risk assessment on each participant by looking at their DNA. The number of genetic variations a person possessed that are known to be associated with a higher risk of depression was the basis for this score. When compared to those with the highest genetic risk scores, those with the lowest scores had a 25% lower risk of developing depression, which is a much smaller effect than lifestyle.

    The group also discovered that leading a healthy lifestyle can lower the risk of depression in people with high, medium, and low genetic risk for depression. This study emphasizes the value of leading a healthy lifestyle regardless of a person’s genetic risk for depression.

    Professor Barbara Sahakian, from the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Cambridge, said: “Although our DNA—the genetic hand we’ve been dealt—can increase our risk of depression, we’ve shown that a healthy lifestyle is potentially more important. “Some of these lifestyle factors are things we have a degree of control over, so trying to find ways to improve them—making sure we have a good night’s sleep and getting out to see friends, for example—could make a real difference to people’s lives.”

    First, they looked at MRI brain scans from slightly less than 33,000 participants and discovered several areas of the brain where a larger volume—more neurons and connections—was associated with a healthy lifestyle. These included the thalamus, hippocampus, amygdala, and pallidum.

    The team then looked for markers in the blood that suggest immune system or metabolism (how our bodies process food and create energy) issues. The body produces the molecule Creactive protein in response to stress, and triglycerides, one of the main types of fat the body uses to store energy for later, were among the markers that were discovered to be linked to lifestyle.

    Several earlier studies have provided evidence for these connections. For instance, stress in life can impair our capacity to control blood sugar, which can deteriorate immune function and hasten the aging process of cells and molecules in the body.

    The body’s capacity to react to stress can be harmed by insufficient exercise and sleep. There is evidence that loneliness and a lack of social support raise immune-deficiency markers and increase the risk of infection.

    The research team discovered that the most significant relationship between lifestyle and immune and metabolic processes existed.

    To put it another way, leading a poorer lifestyle has an effect on our immune system and metabolism, which raises our risk of developing depression.

    Source: Cambridge University

    Image Source: Canva

       

      Hi, I’m Aarti, My Psychoanalytical approach towards my clients is to empower them to better their lives through improving their relationship with themselves. I believe shame and guilt is a common barrier to change. I aim to guide my clients through re authoring their narratives where shame, guilt, and other problems have less power and take up less space.

      Continue Reading
      Advertisement
      Click to comment

      Leave a Reply

      Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

      This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

      News & Research on Psychology | ShareYrHeart

      Newborn’s brains aren’t less developed than those of other primates.

      Published

      on

      Newborn's

      Newborn's brains

      Source: University College London

      Summary: A recent study shows that, contrary to popular belief, human newborn’s brains aren’t substantially less developed than monkey species. It just appears that way since so much brain growth occurs after birth.

      Humans have brains that are typically developed for similar primate species at birth. However, because human brains are so complex than other species, it is mistakenly believed that newborn humans are underdeveloped.

      According to lead author Dr. Aida Gomez-Robles of UCL Anthropology, “This new work changes the overall understanding of the evolution of human brain development. Humans seem so much more helpless when they’re young compared to other primates, not because their brains are comparatively underdeveloped but because they still have much further to go.”

      Measuring the difference between a species’ birth and adult brain sizes allows scientists to study how their brains evolve.

      People appear less mature at birth than other monkey species because humans have smaller brains than other monkeys.

      This new study, however, demonstrates that this metric is deceptive because human brain growth is broadly comparable to that of other primates, including chimpanzees, bonobos, gorillas, and orangutans, according to other assessments.

      The study casts doubt on accepted theories about how the human brain develops over evolution.

      Due to less physical control, it has been believed that humans are born with less developed brains than other animals.

      In order for newborn’s heads to fit through their mothers’ birth canal, they had to further develop outside of the womb, which was assumed to be the outcome of an evolutionary compromise.

      On the basis of this knowledge, scientists proposed that humans have more pliable brains in their early lives and are more susceptible to external stimuli as they mature, because humans emerged relatively underdeveloped.

      It was believed that this early underdevelopment led to increased brain plasticity, which in turn promoted human intelligence.

      The reason why human brains take longer to reach their maximum potential than those of other animals

      It’s not because their brains are significantly underdeveloped at birth, researchers claim; it’s because their brains develop far more slowly.

      Results make it less likely that humans’ superior brain plasticity is the result of being born less developed than other primates. The researchers noted that their findings do not discount the significance of brain plasticity in human evolution.

      Scientists examined 140 distinct mammal species including primates, rodents, carnivores and related ancestors of hominins, to understand the human brain.

      To comprehend how human brains evolved, researchers analysed the length of fatal gestation in current mammals. The proportion of newborn bodies and brains to those of adults, and the total size of newborn and adult brains

      Researchers found that while the brain development of many animal species varies significantly at birth, monkeys’ brains are quite similar.

      Both current monkeys and their hominin relatives do not have considerably lower developmental stages at birth than humans.

      In the US, the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation funded the study.

      Continue Reading

      News & Research on Psychology | ShareYrHeart

      Chronic stress makes the mind desire for comfort food

      Published

      on

      Chronic Stress

      chronic stress for comfort food

      Source: Garvan Institute of Medical Research

      Summary: Chronic stress can suppress the body’s natural satiety signals, increasing appetite and boosting desires for sweets.

      Chronic stress suppresses the brain’s normal satiety-inducing reaction, resulting in continuous reward signals that encourage the consumption of more appetizing food.

      This happens in an area of the brain known as the lateral habenula, which normally blocks these reward impulses when it is active.

      Professor Herzog, the study’s principal author and visiting scientist at the Garvan Institute, comments, “Our findings reveal stress can override a natural brain response that diminishes the pleasure gained from eating — meaning the brain is continuously rewarded to eat.”

      “We showed that chronic stress, combined with a high-calorie diet, can drive more and more food intake as well as a preference for sweet, highly palatable food, thereby promoting weight gain and obesity. This research highlights how crucial a healthy diet is during times of stress.

      From mental stress to weight gain:

      While some people choose to eat less than usual during stressful times, most people choose calorie-dense, high-sugar, and fatty foods.

      To understand what drives these eating behaviours, the team examined how different brain regions responded to long-term stress under varying diets in mouse models.

      “We discovered that an area known as the lateral habenula, which is normally involved in switching off the brain’s reward response, was active in mice on a short-term, high-fat diet to protect the animal from overeating. However, when mice are chronically stressed, this part of the brain remains silent — allowing the reward signals to stay active and encourage feeding for pleasure, no longer responding to satiety regulatory signals,” explains first author Dr Kenny Chi Kin Ip from the Garvan Institute.

      “We found that stressed mice on a high-fat diet gained twice as much weight as mice on the same diet that were not stressed.”

      Researchers discovered that the primary cause of weight gain was the chemical NPY, which the brain normally produces in response to stress.

      Stress mice on a high-fat diet consumed fewer comfort foods and gained less weight when the researchers prevented NPY from activating brain cells in the lateral habenula.

      Next, in a “sucralose preference test,” the mice were offered the choice of drinking water or water that had been artificially sweetened by the investigators.

      “Stressed mice on a high-fat diet consumed three times more sucralose than mice that were on a high-fat diet alone, suggesting that stress not only activates more reward when eating but specifically drives a craving for sweet, palatable food,” says Professor Herzog.

      “Crucially, we did not see this preference for sweetened water in stressed mice that were on a regular diet.”

      Chronic Stress outweighs a balanced, healthy energy level.

      “In stressful situations it’s easy to use a lot of energy and the feeling of reward can calm you down — this is when a boost of energy through food is useful. But when experienced over long periods of time, stress appears to change the equation, driving eating that is bad for the body long term,” says Professor Herzog.

      Stress is a major regulator of eating habits that can override the brain’s natural ability to balance energy needs, according to the study.

      “This research emphasises just how much stress can compromise a healthy energy metabolism,” says Professor Herzog. “It’s a reminder to avoid a stressful lifestyle, and crucially — if you are dealing with long-term stress — try to eat a healthy diet and lock away the junk food.”

      Source: Garvan Institute of Medical Research

      Continue Reading

      News & Research on Psychology | ShareYrHeart

      Children’s behavioral issues are connected to high levels of maternal stress during pregnancy.

      Published

      on

      Pregnancy
      Pregnancy

      Source: American Psychological Association

      Summary: Pregnant women who experience extreme stress, anxiety, or depression may put their unborn children at greater risk of developing mental health problems and behavioral problems as children and teenagers.

      Tung and associates examined information from 55 studies, including almost 45,000 people in total. Each study assessed the psychological distress that expectant mothers experienced, such as stress, depression, or anxiety, and then examined the “externalizing behaviors”—outwardly directed mental health symptoms like aggression or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder—that their offspring exhibited.

      According to parents, children born to pregnant women with higher levels of stress were more likely to behave aggressively.

      Research has long suggested a link between pregnant women’s mental health and their child’s externalizing tendencies. However, in many previous studies, the effects of stress, anxiety, or depression during pregnancy have not been separated from the consequences of parents’ psychological distress after childbirth.

      The only studies that the researchers included in this analysis assessed mothers’ psychological discomfort both during and after pregnancy. They discovered that psychological anguish during pregnancy, in particular, raised the chance of externalizing disorders in children, even after adjusting for postnatal psychological distress.

      Whichever youngsters were involved—boys or girls—the effect was the same. It also remained true for kids in middle childhood (ages 6–12), adolescence (ages 13–18), and early childhood (ages 2–5), with the biggest influence occurring in the former.

      The results corroborate notions that stress hormone exposure during pregnancy may impact a developing child’s brain.

      According to Tung, future studies should concentrate on broadening their scope in order to comprehend the cultural and socioeconomic factors that influence perinatal stress and to create successful therapies.

      “Most existing research has focused on white, middle-class, and higher-educated samples. But experiences of racism, economic disparities, and a lack of health care access are known contributors to stress during pregnancy. Understanding how psychological distress during pregnancy impacts underrepresented families is key to developing equitable public health policies and interventions,” she said.

      She and her colleagues are now conducting two studies focused on understanding the types of support and resources that promote resilience and recovery from stress during pregnancy, particularly for families facing health inequities. The goal is to inform culturally inclusive preventive interventions during pregnancy to help support early mental health resilience and well-being for parents and their children.

      Continue Reading
       
      #

       
       
      #

       

      Treatment Plan for Relationship, Career

       

       
      #

       

      Trending

       

        YOU SHARE
        YOU SHARE